Class is out

Class is out

One of the schools I taught at in Japan was large (~1,000 students) and old.  The decades had worn on the main classroom building quite a bit.  Students were moved to temporary buildings as the main building was scheduled to be demolished and rebuilt, adhering to new earthquake resistence standards.

The number of memories held by these walls must be uncountable … first loves, best friends, fights, successes, failures.  No matter what memories one winds up carrying away from their high school experience, it is an extremely rich time in our lives in terms of memories, experience, and development.  Japanese, who culturally have very strong group identity, seem to feel particularly strong about their schools.  I wonder how the graduates of this school feel about it’s demolition?  Is it the end of an era,or the rebirth and continuance of it?

Given the native Japanese religion of Shintoism’s views on renewal, my guess is that most would look upon it positively.  The main national Shinto shrine, located at Ise, actually has it’s main building torn down and rebuilt every 20 years.

My guess is that while the buildings wall’s seem full of memories, the actual holding place of the memories is in the existence of the school.

(Shot on film – Kodak 400tx @ HC110)

One thought on “Class is out

  1. People have memories that are sparked by many situations. Places often make people remember experiencse from the past. Many places hold memories for me: the sea, school, and foreign countries. One particular place that reminds me of my childhood is Sengami Park in Tsukuba, Japan.

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